Key Points

The situation on the Korean peninsula is now at an inflection point. While all three leaders say they desire additional summits, Kim’s deadline appears to establish an end point for the Trump-Kim bromance. If that is Kim’s intention, now is the time to re-examine the strategic assumptions that inform the pursuit of a peace and disarmament deal by the U.S.-South Korea alliance. Given the risk that negotiations will fall apart, the time from now until the end of the year must be spent preparing a “Plan B” that is based on Kim failing to denuclearize the North.

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Most responsible for that, I suspect, are America’s universities which, since the Sixties, have been increasingly occupied and ruled by socialists of various stripes. Sen. Sanders and AOC may be among the beneficiaries. If so, the rest of us, those who have managed to learn a thing or two over the years, will be the losers.

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Free Joseon may be worthy of assessment and examination to determine if its interests are sufficiently aligned with the ROK/U.S. alliance.  The excitement over the existence of this organization must be tempered with caution and objective analysis. Their stated goals are worthy, namely the elimination of the Kim family regime. Is it the organization that can “out-revolution” the Guerrilla Dynasty and Gulag State? Perhaps, but if so, there has to be agreement on the only long-term solution to the “Korea question” – a United Republic of Korea – and it may require a revolution in the North to defeat the revolutionary leadership of Kim and his Juche ideology to achieve this. If that is not an objective, then I would be hard-pressed to recommend support as much as I too long to see a Free Korea.

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North Korea threatened last week to abandon diplomacy with the United States and resume nuclear and missile testing. Pyongyang’s actions are consistent with its hostile rhetoric; recent reports indicate the regime continues to build up its nuclear and missile infrastructure. If the Trump administration wants to maximize the prospects for serious nuclear negotiations, it will have to escalate pressure on the economic, diplomatic, and military fronts, to remind Kim Jong Un that North Korea will remain a pariah state unless he makes a strategic choice to give up his nuclear program.

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Think about that: What will it cost – in dollars but not just in dollars – to bury our dead and re-build Denver, New York, Washington or Los Angeles following a nuclear attack that we failed to prevent?

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